Sunday, January 6, 2008

Ten Things You Can Do to Save Money This Year: Eight

8. Try Before You Buy. I've saved a ton of money by trying things out before I bought them. Often, I'll hear about a book or product, or I'll hear a song and want to get it right away. But I've gotten in the habit of resisting these impulse buys, even though I'm really good at convincing myself that I should get it, get it, get it!

My best resource for trying before buying is my local library. Even though I live in a small town, I'm fortunate that we have a big library--made even bigger by the CWMARS feature, which allows residents of any MA town to borrow books and other resources from any other MA library for free. If I hear about a book, for instance, I can almost always get a copy from my local library. I simply go online, log in to my account, search the catalog, and order the book. A copy is delivered to my local branch, I get an e-mail, and I go pick it up. Nine times out of ten, the book I want is available. And, nine times out of ten, I decide I don't need to buy it after all.

Other resources are friends, who will often loan a book or CD or movie to me. I'm always careful to keep track of what I have, who I got it from, and to return it promptly.

Rhapsody (an online music subscription service) has a massive database of songs and will let you listen to every song they offer three times for free. If you hear of an artist or a song, you can listen before you buy.

In the case of shoes, exercise equipment, accessories, clothing, etc., I will often seek out a local source where I can try on, touch, or try out the item. If the local price is anything close to what I can find online, I buy local. But, sometimes, the price differential is so substantial that I shop locally, but buy online.

Recently, I wanted a Lexie Barnes bag. I did extensive research online and nearly bought a bag, which was originally $85 on sale for $40, with free shipping and a free gift (a smaller matching bag regularly $18)--the best deal online. However, I just couldn't quite tell if I'd like the pattern or the size of the bag. So, I found a local retailer where I could try the bag on for size. In the end, I loved it--and the salesgirl!--so much that I bought it there. I didn't get the free bag, which I'm still kind of bummed about, and I paid $4 more than I would have online. But, I got instant gratification and I supported a local business. Two things worth feeling good about.

And, for those Thrifters who are aghast at the expensive bag, I'll say that I expect to have this bag forever. As a woman who kept her first pretty bra for twenty years and owns four comforters with an average age of fifteen years, I can assure you that once I buy something I like, I buy it to last. This bag meets my Thrifting biggest rule of thumb: it was a conscious consumption. I thought long and hard about it. I researched my options. I tried before I bought. and this interesting, durable, waterproof, practical, gorgeous, (okay, trendy) bag makes me happy every time I use it--which is every day!

For years, I'd been using tote bags that I'd gotten for free and embellished with buttons, vintage fabric scraps, etc. But as much as I loved them, I also felt sort of dowdy and dumpy whenever I slung them over my shoulder. Now, I feel sporty and special and ready-for-anything. In my version of Thrift, this is what it's all about.

If you're looking for a good deal on a Lexie Barnes bag, by the way, the Lexie Barnes site's sale section has good deals on discontinued patterns. And ebags.com also has good deals and promotions.

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