Sunday, January 6, 2008

Ten Things You Can Do To Save Money This Year: Number Ten

10. Stop watching (commercial) television.
If you are a TV-lover like me, this might seem shocking and impossible-slash-obnoxiously-liberal-intellectual, but hear me out. Commercial television's primary purpose is to create desire in you. Unnecessary desire. To be different than you are, have more and different things; the primary purpose of commercial television, in short, is to get you to buy stuff.

According to Tom Bell, Staff Writer for the Portland Press Herald business section, "Consumer debt is at record levels, and the personal savings rate has fallen into negative territory at minus 0.5 percent. The savings rate has only been negative for a full year twice before, in 1932 and 1933, when Americans were struggling through the Great Depression."

I believe this lack of savings is due in large part to our near constant contact with television and other forms of advertising. It's everywhere! Football stadiums, magazines, tee-shirts, even in some schools. We'll get to those other things later, but for now, if you want to save a substantial sum of money this year, stop watching commercial television. Here's how:
  1. Invest in TiVo or another DVR technology and fast-forward through commercials. Become a conscious consumer of television. Choose your shows, make a schedule, watch the things you know you want to watch and skip all the commercials. You'll be amazed at how light you eventually feel! Without watching all the ads in between the segments of your shows, you are left only with the desire you create yourself (plus the desire created by the things in the show itself and the other ads you consume, but still, it's an improvement!). It feels really good to want only what you really want, not what someone is trying to sell you. On your own would you want an iPhone, or is it just the ads that make them seem irresistible? On your own, would you sit on the couch and feel that you needed a new Toyota/a Thighmaster/a freezer full of Lean Cuisine/a pair of jeans from Old Navy? Odds are, that no, you wouldn't generate that desire on your own. Spending on things that aren't coming from your authentic desire is a huge waste. Investing in a TiVo or DVR is a case where spending money can ultimately save you money.
  2. Stop watching altogether. Cancel your cable and listen to the radio, read the paper, and watch shows and movies on DVD or online. Netflix has an excellent selection and presents a good bang-for-your-buck. Choose this method and you can save money (by not spending on cable) and save even more by cutting out *even more* unnecessary desire than with the TiVo/fast forward solution. Yay! My friend Maria is doing this this winter and so far, it's been a great success for her.
  3. Go old school. I still tape all of my shows using VCRs. I have three VCRs. Two built-in to TVs and one separate. I have a complex system of taping and reviewing and I manage to tape and watch all of my shows without viewing hardly any commercials. This method is more affordable than the DVR version, but also takes more commitment.
  4. Cut back on your cable package. Are you paying for channels you don't really watch? In Massachusetts, most Red Sox games are on NESN, a network you have to pay extra for. But there's no rule that says you have to pay for that channel all year long. If you added a channel for a certain benefit--to watch Dexter, The Sopranos, the Red Sox, etc.--cancel it once that benefit is over. I don't need to pay for NESN during the winter. I don't need to pay for HBO or Showtime when none of the shows I like are airing new episodes. If you don't want or need any premium channels at all, you can call your cable company and ask for "reception" cable. It's the most basic of the basic, and they often won't tell you they offer it, but they are required by law to do so. The price should be about $5 per month, and it should give you all the major networks (ABC, NBC, PBS, CBS, FOX) plus some others. I've used this version of cable in Massachusetts and California and received as few as 13 channels and as many as 57. No matter what your cable operator tells you, they are required to give this to you, so if they give you a hard time, keep at it until they acquiesce.

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Saturday, November 25, 2006

A Word About Advertising on This Site

The ads you see in the top left portion of Thrift are provided by Google's AdSense program. They are generated based on the content of these blog pages, and if you click on them, they generate a small amount of revenue for the site.

Reviews, recommendations, and suggested products or sites that you find anywhere else at Thrift are not paid advertisements. They are independent recommendations based solely on the merit of the product, site, or service at hand.

Thrift will never recommend that you use, try, or buy a service or product unless we have tried it and believe in it ourselves. If you have questions, drop a line to Naomi at graychase@gmail.com.

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