Thursday, October 16, 2008

Free Workshop Tonight

As part of its Third Thursday series of experiential workshops, the Synthesis Center of Amherst, MA is sponsoring an Introduction to Somatic Experiencing with Lynn Abraham.

Tonight, Thursday, October 16th, 6:30-8pm.
The workshop is free and open to anyone.

More info at www.synthesiscenter.org.
413.256.0772

The workshop will introduce basic principles of Somatic Experiencing, a body-focused approach developed by Dr. Peter Levine, author of Waking the Tiger, to resolve symptoms of traumatic stress.

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Free Cooking Class

COOKING WITH THE LOCAL HARVEST for Cancer Survivors and Their Loved Ones
Taught in Shutesbury, MA, Sunday, November 9th, 20083:00 PM - 7:00PM
Learn how to use herbs and spices to create flavorful low-fat meals. With a focus on nutrition and cancer, eating locally and with the seasons, we will prepare a scrumptious meal and enjoy it together.
COST: FREE sponsored by www.Forestmoon.org
TO REGISTER CALL OR E-MAIL PAM ROBERTS AT(413) 625-2402 or pamro@aol.com.

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Friday, October 3, 2008

Why I love the LL Bean card

Far be it from me to encourage credit card spending, but for me, the LL Bean card (now from Barclay's) is the very best of what credit cards can be. The perks are big; the downside minimal.

Let me explain.

I frequently shop at LL Bean. Maybe it's because I'm a Mainer. Maybe because I live in New England where good, durable foul-weather gear is a must. Maybe it's because I'm so practical, but I love LL Bean.

Everything you buy has a lifetime guarantee. You dig? You can buy a pair of winter boots and never have to replace them again as long as you live. Ditto tents, sleeping bags, winter coats, sleds, furniture--everything they sell. You can return whatever you buy at any time if it starts to fall apart--only it pretty much never will. So, rather than buying something somewhere else and paying to replace or repair it, with LL Bean, you opt into a system of quality and dependability that is unmatched.

I recently bought an air mattress, for instance. I had been shopping around for them for years. And every one I had ever encountered had developed a leak, was uncomfortable, or had some crazy pump system--or lack thereof. Enter LL Bean. I found one--on sale ($40 off, I think)--that was durably constructed, got rave reviews from users, and has a handy-dandy-built-in pump. Like, you literally just push a button and the thing blows itself up and then deflates itself, too.

(We haven't slept on it yet, but we did inflate it and spend an evening lounging on it and watching TV and we pretty much decided its better than at least one of our real beds!)

Because I have the LL Bean Visa card, I paid no sales tax, no shipping, and if it turns out it isn't right, I can return it free of charge, too! Plus, if it ever--for the rest of my life--rips, leaks, or fails me in any way, I can return it. For free. AND, because I have the LL Bean Visa, I earned 3% of that purchase back towards another purchase.

Today, for instance, I bought a pair of winter boots. They're vegan, which is hard to find. And by applying my LL Bean coupon dollars ($10), which were a reward for opening the card and making the mattress purchase, I saved $19.95 on shipping and the price of the boots. Plus, I'll earn $7 in coupon dollars toward my next purchase because of a double coupon dollars promotion. I also saved by not paying any sales tax.

If they don't fit or I don't like them, I can just send them back, free of charge, or take them in on my next trip home. (I actually have here a pair of LL Bean boots that I bought a few years ago, but which are horribly uncomfortable and which have a flaw in the lace-up construction--the metal loops shred the laces. I want to return, but keep feeling shy about it since it's been so long. Once I get up the nerve to send them back, if I apply that credit toward this purchase, it's like getting half-priced boots, really.)

Last month, when my sister-in-law wanted to buy her daughter a monogrammed LL Bean backpack for kindergarten, I ordered it for her. The monogramming and shipping were both free, saving her about $20 and earning me $1.65 in coupon dollars.

Seriously, I love this card. The important thing to watch out for--for me--is that I don't get shop-happy and start buying all sorts of things just because it's so easy. I stay away from the catalog until after I've decided I need something--such as a backpack, boots, or an air mattress. I also have to remember to pay off the balance immediately because the interest rate is very (very) high.

The card also gives me 1% in reward dollars for other, non LL Bean purchases. And has some excellent travel-related and other perks. So, at some point, I may start using it for regular monthly purchases--such as the cable bill--so rack up more coupon dollars (which don't expire for a year) but for now, I want to use it only for LL Bean purchases--or large one-time purchases--so I don't fall into the trap of spending more money than I have.

I'm not saying you should necessarily get the LL Bean card. But I am saying that if you're going to have a credit card in your life, it's worth shopping around and finding the very best card for your lifestyle. To learn more about the card, visit LL Bean.com.

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Saturday, March 8, 2008

Ten Things You Can Do to Save Money This Year: Three

3. Plan ahead.
  • Hallowe'en is my favorite day of the year. It's one holiday I feel is really worst investing in. So, I am constantly on the lookout for costume-related items and decorations. I've found almost all of the parts of my best costumes in May or February or some other time of the year when the last thing on most people's minds is Hallowe'en. I find them at yard sales, thrift stores, curb sides, or other free or cheap locations.
  • My stepmother decided that this year would be the last one in which she purchased a "real" tree for Christmas. Instead of going out and buying an artificial tree right away, though, she waited until after Christmas and saved 75%.
  • Every year, on November 1st, I go shopping for half-priced (or better) Hallowe'en decorations. I set a specific budget--say, $5 or $10--and I can usually find plenty of things. I have a plastic bin in the attic where I keep all of my Hallowe'en items, and these things go in there, until the next year. Over the years, I've acquired a great collection, almost all of it at 50% off the retail price (or more).
  • My college class has a reunion every five years. My friends and I always go. One of the important traditions is Ivy Day, when we all dress in white and march in a parade. Rather than scramble for something white to wear, I planned ahead and purchased a white dress at a thrift store for $2--two years before my next reunion. So long as it still fits then, I've made a good investment.
  • Planning ahead works for purchases, as in the examples above, but it also works for saving. If you check the weather and bring along a rain coat or umbrella, you won't be caught buying a cheap poncho for $10 at Disney World or Fenway. If you bring a snack or fill-up a bottle of water, etc. with you when you go out to run errands--or even commute--you'll save the money you would have spent on grabbing a snack or a drink at a store.
  • Sometimes planning ahead means accepting hand-me-downs that might not immediately be useful. I accepted a cake tray, for instance, that was beautiful and would have been expensive to purchase on my own. I almost threw it out once, but was glad I saved it when it was exactly what I needed to present cupcakes during a surprise party, or to hold a crucial item during a solstice ritual, etc.
  • Other plan-ahead items can be things like purchasing gifts ahead of time, when things are on sale, remembering to bring coupons when you go shopping, booking travel in advance, or checking the air in your tires before a long trip, or keeping a bottle of windshield wiper fluid in your car. You get the gist.

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Friday, February 22, 2008

Ten Things You Can Do to Save Money: Four

4. Cancel your magazine subscriptions. You'll reduce waste, free up some time, save money, save some trees and reduce your carbon footprint (those magazines have to be shipped to you on airplanes and trucks) and have less clutter around the house. Some other ways to enjoy magazines for free or cheaper:

  • Request back issues on Freecycle.
  • Check them out of your local library.
  • Share a subscription--or swap--with a friend.
  • Redeem rewards. I collect Coke Rewards codes and then cash them in for prizes. Most recently, I got a year's subscription to O at Home magazine.
  • Get someone to give you the subscription. Every year, my Dad and stepmom give me a year's subscription to the magazine of my choice. And every year, I give one friend a subscription to BUST. (BUST lets subscribers give away one free subscription every year at Christmas when they renew for another year.)
  • Participate in a magazine swap. In my area, there are several. At the Cup and Top cafe in Florence, for instance, there's a magazine rack where people drop off their unwanted back issues and others can take them home or read them on the spot. If there isn't a magazine swap in your neighborhood, why not start one?
  • Read online. (I personally hate reading things online, which is ironic since I make my living writing things online, but, if you don't hate it, this could be an affordable alternative to subscribing to a magazine.)
As with all of my tips, it's first and foremost about quality of life. If you absolutely LOVE your magazine(s). If you look forward to the day it arrives and read it cover to cover and recycle it when you're through or keep it on your shelf and return to it again and again, then, by all means, keep your subscriptions. If, however, you don't really have the time or energy to read them all, let them go. If you want them bad enough, you'll find a free way to still enjoy them.

If you find yourself buying them regularly at newsstands, however, stop that immediately and go back to your subscription. It's much more affordable.

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Wednesday, January 9, 2008

Free Stuff: Hillary for Pres. Bumper Sticker

If you're supporting Senator Clinton in this year's Presidential race, you can get a free bumper sticker here. Go, Hillary!

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Sunday, January 6, 2008

Ten Things You Can Do to Save Money This Year: Eight

8. Try Before You Buy. I've saved a ton of money by trying things out before I bought them. Often, I'll hear about a book or product, or I'll hear a song and want to get it right away. But I've gotten in the habit of resisting these impulse buys, even though I'm really good at convincing myself that I should get it, get it, get it!

My best resource for trying before buying is my local library. Even though I live in a small town, I'm fortunate that we have a big library--made even bigger by the CWMARS feature, which allows residents of any MA town to borrow books and other resources from any other MA library for free. If I hear about a book, for instance, I can almost always get a copy from my local library. I simply go online, log in to my account, search the catalog, and order the book. A copy is delivered to my local branch, I get an e-mail, and I go pick it up. Nine times out of ten, the book I want is available. And, nine times out of ten, I decide I don't need to buy it after all.

Other resources are friends, who will often loan a book or CD or movie to me. I'm always careful to keep track of what I have, who I got it from, and to return it promptly.

Rhapsody (an online music subscription service) has a massive database of songs and will let you listen to every song they offer three times for free. If you hear of an artist or a song, you can listen before you buy.

In the case of shoes, exercise equipment, accessories, clothing, etc., I will often seek out a local source where I can try on, touch, or try out the item. If the local price is anything close to what I can find online, I buy local. But, sometimes, the price differential is so substantial that I shop locally, but buy online.

Recently, I wanted a Lexie Barnes bag. I did extensive research online and nearly bought a bag, which was originally $85 on sale for $40, with free shipping and a free gift (a smaller matching bag regularly $18)--the best deal online. However, I just couldn't quite tell if I'd like the pattern or the size of the bag. So, I found a local retailer where I could try the bag on for size. In the end, I loved it--and the salesgirl!--so much that I bought it there. I didn't get the free bag, which I'm still kind of bummed about, and I paid $4 more than I would have online. But, I got instant gratification and I supported a local business. Two things worth feeling good about.

And, for those Thrifters who are aghast at the expensive bag, I'll say that I expect to have this bag forever. As a woman who kept her first pretty bra for twenty years and owns four comforters with an average age of fifteen years, I can assure you that once I buy something I like, I buy it to last. This bag meets my Thrifting biggest rule of thumb: it was a conscious consumption. I thought long and hard about it. I researched my options. I tried before I bought. and this interesting, durable, waterproof, practical, gorgeous, (okay, trendy) bag makes me happy every time I use it--which is every day!

For years, I'd been using tote bags that I'd gotten for free and embellished with buttons, vintage fabric scraps, etc. But as much as I loved them, I also felt sort of dowdy and dumpy whenever I slung them over my shoulder. Now, I feel sporty and special and ready-for-anything. In my version of Thrift, this is what it's all about.

If you're looking for a good deal on a Lexie Barnes bag, by the way, the Lexie Barnes site's sale section has good deals on discontinued patterns. And ebags.com also has good deals and promotions.

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Ten Things You Can Do to Save Money this Year: Nine

9. Pay your bills online. If your bank doesn't offer free online bill pay, you can generally set it up directly through the company to whom you owe money (such as your phone or cable company).

The savings will vary, but include the cost of checks and the cost of stamps (roughly $25/year if you pay five bills per month through the mail). (Can you think of anything you'd rather do with $25 than buy stamps?)

Additional savings include late fees associated with lost checks, lost or misplaced bills, and late payments.

Automatic online bill pay features can also be advantageous if you are trying to pay down debts, such as credit cards, mortgages, or car loans. If you set a certain amount (above what's due) to go every month, it will definitely happen--and on time--versus the old-fashioned check-writing method, which is more fallible. Some months you may feel you can't afford the extra cash toward a credit card or mortgage if you are the one taking the time to physically write the check, but, if your checking account just does it automatically, you only have to make the decision once.
The one caveat here: if you are a person without a regular income, without direct deposit, with a shared checking account and a flawed system for managing it, etc., don't set up auto bill pay features. Remember, in order for auto bill pay to be beneficial, you have to have the money in your account. If an auto bill pay feature causes overdraft fees, you'll only be causing yourself additional stress, strain, and expense, so skip the tempting convenience and keep writing checks or using manual online bill pay.

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Thursday, November 15, 2007

Free Stuff: o.b. tampons

Johnson and Johnson has set up a web site called mighty small where you can sign up to get a free sample pack of o.b. tampons along with an attractive little carrying case. You have to provide them with shipping information and an e-mail address, but you can opt out of receiving future e-mails and promotional material. You don't have to pay shipping. It takes 6-8 weeks for your sample to arrive.

I don't know how large the sample pack is or what the retail value of the case is, but o.b. tampons go for $5.91 plus shipping for a pack of 40 at Drugstore.com.

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Saturday, January 6, 2007

Thrift: Great Find

Every summer, the Hospice Thrift Store in Northampton has a bag sale to clear out its inventory. This year, I got two vintage dresses, a pair of shoes, two sweaters, two pairs of pants, a night gown, a blouse, five bras, a nightgown for my niece, a book for my friend Jemma, some ribbon, and an assortment of sewing supplies. Had I paid full-price at the thrift store for them, they would have cost $48.50. I paid $6.00 for the whole bag.

Four months later, I can report that I've worn almost everyhing I purchased at the sale repeatedly. The shoes are cute and fit great. One of the vintage dresses is just waiting for the perfect opportunity to come out and show its stuff. And for a while I was wearing the nightgown every night. It was definitely money well spent.

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Affordable Solutions: Cord Clutter

Problem: Masses of tangled cords; long expanses of dangling cords; etc.

Pricey Solution: Cord containment products ranging from $15 and up.

Thrift Solution: garbage or bread bag ties; OxoGoodGrips Cord & Cable Clips ($6 for 4, plus shipping); rubber bands.

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Good Deal/Gift Idea

Among my favorite magazines is BUST. It costs $19.95 per year for a six-issue subscription. Which isn't any kind of great deal, BUT, every winter, they offer a two-for-one subscription offer. So, if you subscribe for a year, when you renew, you and a friend can split the subscription and only pay $10 each for your very own year of BUST. Or, you can give a subscription as a gift, which I do every year.

BUST is a fun, indie, feminist magazine that screens its advertisers, which I really love.

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Get--and give--free books

My friend Naomi (hi, Naomi!) recently turned me on to BookCrossing. It's a non-profit endeavor designed to help spread the joy of reading. The basic idea is that people give books away and then track their progress around the world. I have registered several books that I will be "releasing into the wild" this weekend. Each book has a BCID that I've printed on a lable inside the front cover. I've written a little journal entry for each book, and then, as people find the books, hopefully they will read them, post their own journal entry, and then re-release them.

It serves several thrifty purposes, including two of my most favorite: free entertainment and clutter-clearing.

Commit random acts of literacy! Read & Release at
http://www.bookcrossing.com/friend/graychase

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Friday, December 1, 2006

Free LL Bean Shipping

LL Bean offers an option to its online shoppers called "Smart Post." It's provided by FedEx and can take up to 14 calendar days--but it's completely free.

To use Smart Post when buying online, you must have a coupon code. These codes change from time to time. The most recent one, 2324840, seems to have been discontinued. I haven't ascertained the new code yet. If you have, please drop me a line or post a comment.

If you're ordering via catalog, I think you can ask the customer service representative directly for SmartPost, although I've not yet tried this.

When I get the new code, I'll post it here.

If you have a SmartPost code, here's how to use it:

When checking out, click the Redeem button, then click the Promotions tab, and enter the 7-digit code in the box. Then click Continue Checkout. Your order total in the upper right corner (and in your shopping cart) should reflect the savings.

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