Thursday, October 16, 2008

Free Workshop Tonight

As part of its Third Thursday series of experiential workshops, the Synthesis Center of Amherst, MA is sponsoring an Introduction to Somatic Experiencing with Lynn Abraham.

Tonight, Thursday, October 16th, 6:30-8pm.
The workshop is free and open to anyone.

More info at www.synthesiscenter.org.
413.256.0772

The workshop will introduce basic principles of Somatic Experiencing, a body-focused approach developed by Dr. Peter Levine, author of Waking the Tiger, to resolve symptoms of traumatic stress.

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Free Cooking Class

COOKING WITH THE LOCAL HARVEST for Cancer Survivors and Their Loved Ones
Taught in Shutesbury, MA, Sunday, November 9th, 20083:00 PM - 7:00PM
Learn how to use herbs and spices to create flavorful low-fat meals. With a focus on nutrition and cancer, eating locally and with the seasons, we will prepare a scrumptious meal and enjoy it together.
COST: FREE sponsored by www.Forestmoon.org
TO REGISTER CALL OR E-MAIL PAM ROBERTS AT(413) 625-2402 or pamro@aol.com.

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Wednesday, October 8, 2008

Discount oil changes for ladies

Brake King in Northampton offer's half-priced oil changes for women on Wednesdays. The service is friendly--and they even have a "queer-safe" rainbow sticker on the door. I think I saved about $13 by going there for my last oil change--which translates to about three and a half gallons of heating oil.

236 Pleasant St
Northampton, MA 01060
(413) 584-4988

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Friday, October 3, 2008

Why I love the LL Bean card

Far be it from me to encourage credit card spending, but for me, the LL Bean card (now from Barclay's) is the very best of what credit cards can be. The perks are big; the downside minimal.

Let me explain.

I frequently shop at LL Bean. Maybe it's because I'm a Mainer. Maybe because I live in New England where good, durable foul-weather gear is a must. Maybe it's because I'm so practical, but I love LL Bean.

Everything you buy has a lifetime guarantee. You dig? You can buy a pair of winter boots and never have to replace them again as long as you live. Ditto tents, sleeping bags, winter coats, sleds, furniture--everything they sell. You can return whatever you buy at any time if it starts to fall apart--only it pretty much never will. So, rather than buying something somewhere else and paying to replace or repair it, with LL Bean, you opt into a system of quality and dependability that is unmatched.

I recently bought an air mattress, for instance. I had been shopping around for them for years. And every one I had ever encountered had developed a leak, was uncomfortable, or had some crazy pump system--or lack thereof. Enter LL Bean. I found one--on sale ($40 off, I think)--that was durably constructed, got rave reviews from users, and has a handy-dandy-built-in pump. Like, you literally just push a button and the thing blows itself up and then deflates itself, too.

(We haven't slept on it yet, but we did inflate it and spend an evening lounging on it and watching TV and we pretty much decided its better than at least one of our real beds!)

Because I have the LL Bean Visa card, I paid no sales tax, no shipping, and if it turns out it isn't right, I can return it free of charge, too! Plus, if it ever--for the rest of my life--rips, leaks, or fails me in any way, I can return it. For free. AND, because I have the LL Bean Visa, I earned 3% of that purchase back towards another purchase.

Today, for instance, I bought a pair of winter boots. They're vegan, which is hard to find. And by applying my LL Bean coupon dollars ($10), which were a reward for opening the card and making the mattress purchase, I saved $19.95 on shipping and the price of the boots. Plus, I'll earn $7 in coupon dollars toward my next purchase because of a double coupon dollars promotion. I also saved by not paying any sales tax.

If they don't fit or I don't like them, I can just send them back, free of charge, or take them in on my next trip home. (I actually have here a pair of LL Bean boots that I bought a few years ago, but which are horribly uncomfortable and which have a flaw in the lace-up construction--the metal loops shred the laces. I want to return, but keep feeling shy about it since it's been so long. Once I get up the nerve to send them back, if I apply that credit toward this purchase, it's like getting half-priced boots, really.)

Last month, when my sister-in-law wanted to buy her daughter a monogrammed LL Bean backpack for kindergarten, I ordered it for her. The monogramming and shipping were both free, saving her about $20 and earning me $1.65 in coupon dollars.

Seriously, I love this card. The important thing to watch out for--for me--is that I don't get shop-happy and start buying all sorts of things just because it's so easy. I stay away from the catalog until after I've decided I need something--such as a backpack, boots, or an air mattress. I also have to remember to pay off the balance immediately because the interest rate is very (very) high.

The card also gives me 1% in reward dollars for other, non LL Bean purchases. And has some excellent travel-related and other perks. So, at some point, I may start using it for regular monthly purchases--such as the cable bill--so rack up more coupon dollars (which don't expire for a year) but for now, I want to use it only for LL Bean purchases--or large one-time purchases--so I don't fall into the trap of spending more money than I have.

I'm not saying you should necessarily get the LL Bean card. But I am saying that if you're going to have a credit card in your life, it's worth shopping around and finding the very best card for your lifestyle. To learn more about the card, visit LL Bean.com.

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Thursday, October 2, 2008

Compare Heating Oil Prices

As we move into the dreaded heating oil season, it's important to make an informed choice when you purchase your home heating oil.

To research prices in New England, visit NewEnglandOil.

As of 9/25/08, the best price in my area appears to be $3.43, down from $3.89 this summer. (I'm so glad I didn't buy then!)

If your dealer doesn't offer it outright, go ahead and ask if they offer a discount for paying in cash/check, or for paying within a certain time period (a week, ten days, 30 days). I've been able to save ten cents a gallon by paying my dealer within ten days by check.

Prices are fluctuating daily, so be sure to call ahead to check pricing and availability in your area. Also ask about the minimum delivery amount.

Crude oil prices dropped to a new low today, so it may be a good time to check in on your local dealers' prices.

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Wednesday, April 9, 2008

To Buy or Not to Buy: Renter's Insurance

I recently got to the point in my life where I felt it was important to insure my belongings. I've been a renter for 14 years and, in general, have been too cash-strapped to invest in renter's insurance. Instead, I invested in extra smoke detectors, a fire extinguisher, and used some common sense. (No burning candles left unattended; know where the shut-off valve for the water and gas lines are, lock the doors and windows at night or when I'm away, etc.)

Also, I've been thrifty about my furniture, dishes, and other belongings. 90% of my books are used and could be replaced easily and affordably. Same with my furniture. For instance, I'm currently living in a two-story, three-bedroom apartment with living room, dining room, kitchen, walk-up attic, and full (unfinished) basement. I've fully furnished the property--including stocking the cupboards with pots and pans, and an overabundance of linens--and hardly spent a dime. Most of what I own, I was able to come across free, cheap, or to receive as a gift.

However, now that I have a more stable income and I can actually afford to shell out a bit of cash to protect my possessions, it really does make sense. I know several people who have lost everything to fire. Four were apartment-dwellers; one a homeowner. It happens. I live in a duplex, which means no matter how safe I am in my apartment, if my neighbors (my horrid landlords) were to have an accident or cause a fire, I would likely also suffer damage and loss at my place--an event totally beyond my control.

While I've been thrifty in acquiring my possessions, it would be expensive, disheartening, exhausting, and incredibly time-consuming to replace them. It's taken years to accumulate my thrifty collection of stuff; it would take just as long to replace it using the same method.

Plus, I have a few nice things now. I invested in a delicious set of expensive sheets that make me moan a little bit with joy every time I slip between them. I got them on sale, but they'd cost almost $90 to replace. I have three televisions--all of which I got for free, but they're very nice and replacing them would be costly. Three computers, a printer, three digital cameras, MP3 players, my bed--you get the drift.

So, I went ahead and got a quote from a local insurance agency. I made sure to get replacement coverage, which means that if my house burns down, I can buy a new bed, television, printer, etc. and my insurance will reimburse me. If you don't have this coverage--which costs a little extra--then you'll only be reimbursed for the actual cost of your belongings. How much is a five-year old full-sized bed worth versus the cost of replacing it? Or a one-year old computer? If you don't get replacement value coverage, you may as well not buy insurance at all, in my opinion.

But, here's the catch. After choosing my policy and sending in my first payment, a few weeks went by and I still hadn't received a copy of the policy. I called my agent and she discovered that I had, in fact, been turned down by the insurance company. Why? All they would tell her was that it was my credit--and they sent her back my check.

This infuriated me. My credit score is very good. I'm gainfully and stably employed in the same field I've been in for 14 years. I don't have a criminal record. But you know what I do have? A bankruptcy on my record. It's been more than three years. My credit score is on the brink of being in the second highest range possible. My income is twice the median for my region. I have a savings account, an IRA, and a 401(k). I don't smoke or own a dog (things that make it harder to get insured), apart from a four-month period where I stopped paying just before my bankruptcy, I have never missed a payment on anything since my first credit card was opened 16 years ago. And I only took out the minimum--$15,000--on my policy. I'm 35-years old with no history of fraud or any reason for them to believe that I don't deserve their coverage.

But, they rejected me. The good news, I suppose, is that another company was willing to insure me. They don't look at a person's credit history, I'm told. Their rates are 20% higher, though.

Mostly, I'm angry that I'm losing money because of something so unfair. They didn't even talk to me. They just rejected me because of--I assume--my bankruptcy.

It's so odd that I was able to get a car loan with a competitive rate, but not renter's insurance.

At any rate, I'm switching my car insurance over to the same agency that got me the renter's insurance, so I'll save a little bit of money there and make up some of the difference between the first policy's rate and the second.

And, as a bonus, the company that rejected me has been covering me for free until I sign on with another company, so, technically, I'm getting about a month and a half of free renter's insurance from them.

In the end, I'm a little bitter, but at least I am insured. And if I took the time to shop around more, I might even find a more competitive rate. For now, there are just too many other things to take care of, so I'm going to fork over the dough ($175/year) for the company that's willing to take me on (Vermont Mutual).

The company that rejected me, by the way, was Merrimack mutual.

I wonder if this was a soft pull on my credit or not? If they dinged my credit by checking it for this, I'm going to be extra-special pissed off!

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Tuesday, April 8, 2008

Save Money on Heating Oil

If you live in New England and heat your home or business with oil, before you buy your next batch of heating oil, visit NewEnglandOil.com. Click on your state to get a chart of local rates from various suppliers.

I tried this out recently and was pleased to discover that my supplier is one of the least expensive in the region. However, the rate indicated in the chart did not match what I paid when I ordered oil last week, so clearly the chart isn't up-to-the-minute. But, I think it still pays to check it out and perhaps call around to confirm prices.

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Friday, February 22, 2008

Ten Things You Can Do to Save Money: Four

4. Cancel your magazine subscriptions. You'll reduce waste, free up some time, save money, save some trees and reduce your carbon footprint (those magazines have to be shipped to you on airplanes and trucks) and have less clutter around the house. Some other ways to enjoy magazines for free or cheaper:

  • Request back issues on Freecycle.
  • Check them out of your local library.
  • Share a subscription--or swap--with a friend.
  • Redeem rewards. I collect Coke Rewards codes and then cash them in for prizes. Most recently, I got a year's subscription to O at Home magazine.
  • Get someone to give you the subscription. Every year, my Dad and stepmom give me a year's subscription to the magazine of my choice. And every year, I give one friend a subscription to BUST. (BUST lets subscribers give away one free subscription every year at Christmas when they renew for another year.)
  • Participate in a magazine swap. In my area, there are several. At the Cup and Top cafe in Florence, for instance, there's a magazine rack where people drop off their unwanted back issues and others can take them home or read them on the spot. If there isn't a magazine swap in your neighborhood, why not start one?
  • Read online. (I personally hate reading things online, which is ironic since I make my living writing things online, but, if you don't hate it, this could be an affordable alternative to subscribing to a magazine.)
As with all of my tips, it's first and foremost about quality of life. If you absolutely LOVE your magazine(s). If you look forward to the day it arrives and read it cover to cover and recycle it when you're through or keep it on your shelf and return to it again and again, then, by all means, keep your subscriptions. If, however, you don't really have the time or energy to read them all, let them go. If you want them bad enough, you'll find a free way to still enjoy them.

If you find yourself buying them regularly at newsstands, however, stop that immediately and go back to your subscription. It's much more affordable.

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Friday, March 2, 2007

A Place to Call 'Home': 3.2.07

Since I became clear that my main focus--the thing I want most in the world--is a home of my own, I have learned and done the following things:

1) Checked my credit score. It's up 40 points since this time last year! This moves me into a whole new realm of lending rate possibilities! Combed over three credit reports from the three major companies that produce them to make sure the information was correct. Devised a strategy for raising that score even more in the next six months. (Seriously pay down balances, in part by borrowing money from my mom short-term at 0%; increase credit limits; don't apply for or open any new cards; continue to pay on time and pay more than minimum payments; don't use the cards for new purchases; transfer balances to lower rate cards whenever practical.)

2) Sat with a friend and looked on the Internet at every single available house we could find in Greenfield (half an hour north of here) as well as the ones near my price range in Northampton and other towns. Found one near my price range that I absolutely loved, but by the time I got up the courage to call a realtor, the listing had been removed.

3) Asked a homeowning friend if her home-improvement wiz partner would possibly help me in my search by doing some walkthroughs or helping to answer questions or talk to realtors and/or sellers.

4) Investigated options at the USDA. Their rural development office may just have a program that could assist someone like me. Requested information via e-mail, but was told it would be better to come in person.

5) Instituted a new spending policy and budget method. I have alotted $50/week for groceries and I do not go over this amount. I have allotted $30 per week for entertainment and I keep that cash in my wallet. I re-up on Wednesdays. I do not go over. It's tremendously satisfying to still have cash in my wallet at the end of the week. And it prevents me from making purchases because I have to think--do I really want this? This way, I only get the things I really do want. This week, I only was able to give myself $10 of entertainment money because I didn't earn enough to do more, but I spent less on groceries, so the combination of food and entertainment money seems to be happening sort of organically. I can make choices about how to re-allocate funds on an as needed basis, as long as I don't go over. For instance, there was plenty of food in the cupboards, so I had enough money to treat myself to take out food twice, a coffee, and a soda so far this week--entertainment expenses that came out of my grocery budget.

6) Began investigating alternatives to traditional homes. For example, Tumbleweed Tiny Houses. Perhaps buying land and building a home like one of these will be the answer. I'm also interested in looking into Cob houses, and found a woman who does how-to workshops. She doesn't have a web site, but you can e-mail her at amlywig@yahoo.com. (Her name is Amber DeVoss.) I haven't contacted her yet, but if I do, I'll post the results here.

7) Got some information about local resources, including a lead on classes for potential first-time hoembuyers; a recommendation for a good loan officer at a local bank; and the name of a local housing organization (HAP).

8) Created a notebook where I can take notes, keep track of ideas, and form a coherent plan.

9) Read part of a book for first-time homebuyers.

10) Pursued work with higher-paying clients; completed and invoice for work more quickly.

11) Was conscious of every purchase I made--from underwear to coffee to gas--in terms of my home ownership project. Every dollar I spend on something other than a home is a dollar I spend on something other than a home. It's okay to do this; I just want to be really aware of and satisfied by my choices as I go. I don't feel deprived. I feel excited and alive.

12) Created this category at my Thrift blog.

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Saturday, January 6, 2007

Thrift: Great Find

Every summer, the Hospice Thrift Store in Northampton has a bag sale to clear out its inventory. This year, I got two vintage dresses, a pair of shoes, two sweaters, two pairs of pants, a night gown, a blouse, five bras, a nightgown for my niece, a book for my friend Jemma, some ribbon, and an assortment of sewing supplies. Had I paid full-price at the thrift store for them, they would have cost $48.50. I paid $6.00 for the whole bag.

Four months later, I can report that I've worn almost everyhing I purchased at the sale repeatedly. The shoes are cute and fit great. One of the vintage dresses is just waiting for the perfect opportunity to come out and show its stuff. And for a while I was wearing the nightgown every night. It was definitely money well spent.

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Friday, December 1, 2006

This Day in Thrift: December 1, 2006

Today I...

...got $25 worth of free gas using a gift card I received from Verizon for switching back to their service from Vonage. I read the insert completely so I'd know how to use it, and put it in my wallet so it would be handy when the time came.

...went to my mechanic about an issue I was having with my headlights. It turned out it was something I could fix myself. He explained how and saved me about $40 in labor. This sort of savings is the happy result of fostering good relationships with people. Being kind, polite, courteous, respectful, and friendly to the people who take care of you is an investment, which usually rewards you with either direct financial dividends, or the less quantifiable but still satisfying emotional ones.

...shipped a DVD I had sold at Half.com. By selling it, I earned $10 back on a DVD I purchased for about $20 and watched once. I shipped it first class, rather than media mail, because the price was nearly the same. By opting for first class, I could ship my package from the automated postal machine, which saved me from spending my time standing in line. Using first class also gives me a competitive edge over other sellers who use the slower media mail option. I advertise the free upgrade to first class with all single DVD or CD orders, and it sets me apart from other sellers offering the same or similar prices for the items I'm selling.

...shopped at Deals and Steals, which my friend Tim calls, "the used food store." I remembered to bring my shopping list with me, which helps. And even though I was hungry--a "no-no" for any food shopping--I still made good choices. For those of you who've never been, or aren't local, Deals and Steals is where dented and scratched goods and foods from places like Whole Foods wind up. It's a great place to get organic foods, for instance, but at half what you'd pay for them at a fancy retail store--or even at your co-op. Today I spent less than $20 and I came home with the following:

2 Newman's Own dark chocolate bars, $.75 each, approx. savings: $2.49
32 oz Grapeseed Oil, $6.75, approx. savings: $1.25
Tom's of Maine Toothpaste, 4.3 oz, $2.25, approx. savings: $.45

I also bought several cans of organic foods that I use often, including diced tomatoes and prepared foods like soups and one of my favorite treats, Amy's spaghetti-o's with tofu meatballs. I saved more than a dollar on each canned product I purchased. These have the added benefit of saving money later because on days when I'm too tired, or busy, or sick to cook, instead of eating out or ordering in, I can heat up something easy and good for me without spending any extra money.

Deals and Steals also sells clothing, shoes, and accessories, and I was able to try on a pair of earwarmers ($25 retail) that I'd been eyeing in the LL Bean catalog. It turns out that they weren't as comfortable as I thought they were. If I wanted to buy them, I could have gotten them for $9.99 (saving roughly $15), but since I now know I don't want them, I saved $25.

...heard about a book on Oprah ("The Money Coach's Guide to Your First Million") that I was excited about. (I like reading the advice of money coaches and financial advisors.) But, I have a firm "try before you buy" policy when it comes to books. So, instead of buying the book, I went online to my local library's website. I searched for the book, found it, and requested it. When it comes in, I'll get an e-mail and go pick it up. I'm lucky to live in a state where the public library system is really strong, has an online presence, and is extremely well-integrated. I'm able to request books from all over the state, and they are delivered right to my local branch.

Because I appreciate and use this service so often--and it saves me so much money--I wrote a thank you note to the director of the library this summer. I am not in a position to make a meaningful financial contribution to the library, but taking the time to write a note of thanks to a person, business, or institution that serves you well is an important way to show your support and encouragement. It's always worth doing and I strongly recommend it.

...I made dinner in--one of the canned treats I got today. I am tired and there's a big thunderstorm happening, so I'm spending my Friday night at home doing things that are free. I'm catching up on work and volunteer projects, doing some comparison shopping for Christmas gifts and other things, and later I'll watch one (or two) of the DVDs I've got from Netflix, and/or read the book I started this week (a gift from a friend who owns a bookstore.) I may also take a bubble bath, with some aromatherapeutic bath suds that I got on a different trip to Deals and Steals, or may take an epsom salt bath, a good way to relax and reduce aches and pains. (I got epsom salts BOGO a few months ago, so I'm well-stocked.)

...protected my appliances and conserved electricity. This thunderstorm is a real doozy, with lightning cracking so close and so loud it vibrates inside my chest. The warnings were all over the news today. So, when the storm started, I went around the house and unplugged every appliance that I could. If there is a lightning strike, I won't lose my TV or my DVD player, my humidifier or my lamps, my printers or my laptop. These things would be very pricey to replace, and upsetting to live without. It's not likely that my home or these power sources will be hit by lightning, but the simple step of unplugging things tonight offers a great potential savings, so it's completely worth it.

...checked my lottery ticket to see if I won. The other day, on a whim, I bought a lottery ticket. I had run into my ex-boyfriend someplace so utterly unexpected (and got really upset about it) that I decided I should try and turn my "luck" on its end. If I could run into him against the greatest of odds, perhaps I could win the lottery! I didn't. But it still cheered me up to buy the ticket...so I think it was worth the dollar. :-)

…listed an item for sale on eBay. It's a vintage TV Guide issue with Dinah Shore on the cover. I used to collect women's sports memorabilia, but now I'm letting go of most of it because I just don't have the space to properly store it. I won't get much—if any—money for it, but since I don't know anyone who'd like to get it as a gift, attempting to sell feels better than just dropping it off at the Book Shed at the dump, or at Salvation Army. (The book shed is--well, a shed--full of discarded books at the dump. You can leave yours, and also take anything you like.

…found the receipt for an office visit to my physical therapist, for which the billing department says I didn't pay. Now I can write them and, for the price of a stamp and a photocopy, resolve the issue.

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